Category Archives: Global governance

Replies: A Third Generation of Global Governance Research

David Coen and I published ‘Wanted: A Third Generation of Global Governance Research’ in August 2015 where we proposed advancing a powerful ‘third generation’ of global governance research by integrating insights across International Relations, European Public Policy and International Law scholarship. I am glad to say the piece has been well-received and provoked quite a lot of debate already! I’m particularly grateful to colleagues who have taken the time to contribute response pieces to The Governance blog. Continue reading Replies: A Third Generation of Global Governance Research

Wanted: A Third Generation of Global Governance Research

David Coen, founding Director of the UCL Global Governance Institute (GGI), and I have just published a Commentary in the journal Governance which sets out our initial thoughts on an ambitious new research agenda on global governance. Together with colleagues at UCL and beyond, the GGI is dedicated to advancing a research agenda on global governance which seeks to integrate insights across an theoretically and empirically-rich second generation of scholarship to ground a powerful third generation of global governance scholarship, distinguished by a concern for the complexity and dynamism of global public policy-making and delivery in the 21st century. An extract of the piece follows, the full publication can be viewed here. Continue reading Wanted: A Third Generation of Global Governance Research

What is the functional need/specific benefit of global human rights governance?

The actors, mechanisms, and processes of contemporary global human rights governance have their antecedents in a desire to prevent massive violence and warfare. However, the remit has rapidly evolved to encompass a range of global policy challenges, from universal health provision to sustainable development. Human rights provides one normative bedrock upon which to anchor a conception of governance in the service of the global common good. Notwithstanding debate over their meaning and conceptual parameters, there is widespread acceptance that human rights norms are substantially important, reflecting pragmatic, deeply-held shared concerns. Continue reading What is the functional need/specific benefit of global human rights governance?

How can the Int’l Criminal Court be Strengthened?

On 30 April I participated in a seminar at Chatham House on renovating international governance institutions sponsored by Open Society Foundations.  It was a fascinating discussion spanning international finance, health, democracy and human rights.  I had the pleasure of leading a discussion on the international criminal court.  Strikingly, in much discussion of global governance institutions the question of international enforceability is rarely tabled.  Debate is often foregrounded in an emphasis on cooperation and aligning interests over enforcement action in the face of trenchant resistance to transnational regulatory goals.  In part, this reflects a prevailing ‘common sense’ position which privileges applying a problem-solving pragmatism to the global governance problematique. Continue reading How can the Int’l Criminal Court be Strengthened?

Governing the UN Sustainable Development Goals

With colleagues at UCL and the London International Development Centre, we have published a piece on the governance of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) in The Lancet Global Health.  This publication reflects a highly interdisciplinary collaboration which took the form of a series of intensive workshops through 2014-15 convened by Dr Jeff Waage and Chris Yap.  The report provides an analytical review of the SDG process, drawing on experts in different SDG areas identifying potential interactions. This exercise generates a Continue reading Governing the UN Sustainable Development Goals